Connect with us

Apartments

The Confederation of Real Estate Developer’s Associations of India (CREDAI)

At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti.

Published

on

The Confederation of Real Estate Developer’s Associations of India (CREDAI) is the apex body of organized Real Estate Developers Associations, representing over 9000 Developers, spread across 20 states of the country. CREDAI has also formulated guidelines in the form of code of conduct to promote integrity and transparency among Developers and provide confidence and comfort to the customers. It also represents issues and proactive policies before the Government and other concerned authorities for the development of the industry. CREDAI encourages research for better construction techniques in the industry for a safe and secure affordable housing for the customer.

Major Objectives

To perpetuate an ethical code of conduct, which is self-imposed & mandatory for all the member developers/builder of CREDAI AP to maintain integrity and transparency in the profession of Real Estate Development. To represent the developers/builders across the state by communicating / representing with the government authorities for the formulation of proactive policies for this profession.

To encourage and support the developers/builders to increase their efficiency in the development/construction activities by introducing the latest technologies. To facilitate easy housing finance availability to the property purchasers by working in coordination with the leading housing finance institutions / Banks.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Apartments

Piramal Realty sells over 300 apartments in Thane `value housing’ project

Published

on

Piramal Realty, the real estate development arm of Piramal Group, has sold more than 300 apartments with a sales value of ₹200 crore in its maiden value housing project at Piramal Vaikunth in Thane. The project offers one, 1+Study and 2-BHK apartments with prices starting at ₹57 lakh.

“Consumers are now moving towards projects that offer efficient layouts with amenities at the right price and in good locations. We are glad to establish our presence in the value-housing segment and have impressed our consumers with the overall offering of ‘A-Class Homes’,” Gaurav Sawhney, President, Sales & Marketing at Piramal Realty said.

Piramal Vaikunth is a residential complex spread over 32 acres, featuring high-rise towers, townhouses, world-class amenities and facilities. The development will also include an ISKCON temple.

Credits: thehindubusinessline

Continue Reading

Apartments

Oberoi Realty Q3 profit up 7 per cent

Published

on

Oberoi Realty has reported 7 per cent increase in consolidated net profit at ₹148.24 crore for the quarter ended December despite fall in total income. Its net profit in the year-ago period stood at Rs 137.93 crore.

The company’s total income, however, fell to ₹536.53 crore in the third quarter of 2019-20 from ₹548.79 crore in the same period a year ago, according to a regulatory filing.

“The Union Budget and the new RBI policy have paved the path to growth and liquidity. Reputed corporates thrive in challenging times due to their ability to adapt and deliver value to their stakeholders,” CMD Vikas Oberoi said. “We have also seen a marked improvement in buyer interest across all our projects; our diversified businesses also continue to perform well,” he added.

Mumbai-based Oberoi Realty is one of the leading real estate developers in the country.

Credits: thehindubusinessline

Continue Reading

Apartments

India demolishes Kerala skyscrapers over environmental violations

Published

on

A high-rise residential building is demolished with controlled blasting in Kochi, India, 11 January, 2020.

Authorities in southern India have demolished two luxury lakeside apartment complexes that were built in violation of environmental rules.

Residents of the high-rises in the state of Kerala watched as their homes and investments imploded in seconds.

The Supreme Court ordered the demolition last year, after a committee found that they were built in breach of rules protecting coastal areas.

Two more skyscrapers were set to be razed on Sunday.

In total, some 343 flats – home to about 2,000 people – were expected to be destroyed over the weekend in what has been described as one of India’s largest demolition drives involving residential buildings.

The H2O Holy Faith complex, containing 90 flats, was the first to be brought down on Saturday. It took just seconds for the 19-floor building to be destroyed in a controlled implosion.

The twin towers of Alfa Serene were next.

  • How do you demolish a skyscraper?
  • The families waiting for their homes to be blown up

Resident Shamshudeen Karunagapally said his wife and children could not watch the buildings go down as it was “too painful for them to see their dreams shatter before their eyes”.

“We are suffering without any fault,” he told AFP news agency.

How did we get here?

The Kerala Coastal Zone Management Authority (KCZMA), which was created to prevent degradation of coastal and marine areas, says permission for the buildings to be constructed was given by local officials without its approval.

The KCZMA said the location of the apartment complexes, in the municipality of Maradu, was a critically vulnerable area where no new construction was allowed.

After they were built, bankers, executives and affluent retirees were among those who bought up the luxury apartments. One bank executive told the BBC last year that he had spent what would now amount to $70,000 (£55,000) to purchase a 2,140 sq ft (198 sq m) flat in Alfa Serene in 2006.

One of his neighbours sold his apartment last year for $176,000, he said.

But in May, the Supreme Court ruled in favour of KCZMA and ordered the demolition of the buildings, although officials had never sought it.

The court said builders were in breach of construction rules and called illegal construction in the area a “colossal loss” to the environment.

It also referred to the devastating floods in Kerala in 2018 and said they were the result of “the entire environment being degraded and coastal zones being illegally occupied”.

Following the top court ruling, some residents initially refused to leave. But officials cut water and electricity supplies to the buildings, leaving them with no choice but to go.

The state government has been ordered to pay “interim compensation” of about $35,000 (£27,000) to affected residents, according to local media reports.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending

Copyright © 2020 Sthirasti.com All Rights Reserved